How We Deal with Cell Phones

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How We Deal with Cell Phones

Junior Aarron Seymour tries to hide his phone from Mrs. Foreman

Junior Aarron Seymour tries to hide his phone from Mrs. Foreman

Ericka Foreman

Junior Aarron Seymour tries to hide his phone from Mrs. Foreman

Ericka Foreman

Ericka Foreman

Junior Aarron Seymour tries to hide his phone from Mrs. Foreman

Dylan Leonard Serie, Editor

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Almost everyone at Black River has a phone. In fact, NPR found that over half of American children have a cell phone at age 11, and the numbers only go up from there. Although the majority of Black River’s high schoolers have phones, they are not to be used without teacher permission.

But that hasn’t stopped students. 

Anya Scott, a Black River freshman, says students tend to secretly use their phones when the teacher is sitting far away or when a video is playing. She also claims “if the student needs to talk to their parents, they should be able too.” 

History teacher Greg Dykhouse offers a different but balanced opinion on the matter. He says that he has no problem with kids having their phones in class, but he expects them to be responsible as well to know it is appropriate to use them. “If I was the king of school, and I could make things the way I wanted them to be, I would have no problem with students carrying their technology; I would expect them to know when to use them,” he says.

Dykhouse also states that he doesn’t think Black River will ban phones if they become more of a problem, but is interested in the fact that Forest Hills schools now have a full ban on cell phones in school.

Scott says that appropriate phone usage depends on the context of the situation, like if the teacher is giving a lecture and students are on their phone, that would be an inappropriate time, but in the hallways between classes, it should be acceptable.

This is a bit different than the current Black River Student Handbook, which states:       

Cellular phone and other electronic communication devices may not be used by students during the academic school day unless under the direct supervision of a staff member and adhering to the school’s acceptable use policy. This includes passing time and lunchtime.                                   

What do you think? Is Black River’s cell phone policy the best way to help students get the most out of their educational opportunities? Submit your opinion article to our editorial board– we’ll let you know if your work has been accepted!